Thursday, December 14 2017
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psychiatree

Welcome!

Hello, I am Psychiatree . I search the web for interesting news, views and information about mental health and human behaviour. Join me in my quest to discover the best of the web!

The copyrights of images and excerpts are owned by the original sources.

Constant email notifications are a source of stress

Constant email notifications are a source of stress

Due to technology enabling people to be at their email's constant beck and call, a culture has developed where people must feel they are constantly available for work. As a result, an 'unwritten organisational etiquette' has become ingrained in the workplace and employees have developed habits which negatively impact on their emotional well-being. Studies have found that continuously checking and reading emails due to a 'push notification' feature which alerts users to new messages even when they are not in their Mail app, prompts signs of tension and worry.

Does mental illness enhance creativity?

Does mental illness enhance creativity?

Everyone can cite famous people from Vincent Van Gogh and Virginia Woolf to Tony Hancock and Robin Williams, who were exceptionally creative and experienced mental health problems. However there is remarkably little good data on the link between creativity and mental illness.

Understanding why people use heroin

Understanding why people use heroin

Heroin allows people in pain a way to integrate into a community – it doesn’t just provide a temporary escape from an ugly reality, but also a sense of belonging. How much someone uses drugs is often a measure of how much pain they have suffered, how isolated they are. Addiction is a symptom of something very wrong with our society.

Compulsive shoplifting

Compulsive shoplifting

Shoplifting in Britain costs more than £300m a year, according to the British Retail Consortium, with the value of goods stolen from British shops having risen to its highest level in a decade. For some people, shoplifting is a compulsive habit. A lead counsellor at Addictions UK believes this pathological need to shoplift is far more common than people realise. "It is a genuine addiction that stems from the same issue as a gambling or drinking addiction. These people shoplift because they feel compelled to act by their subconscious, rather than for financial gain. They experience an emotional urge to experience the rush of adrenaline - and consequently dopamine - they receive from shoplifting, and the only way to suppress that is by giving in. From an addict's point of view, this rush mitigates all thought of those they are affecting."

The Semicolon Tattoo Project

The Semicolon Tattoo Project

The Semicolon Tattoo Project is an ongoing awareness campaign that seeks to engage communities in suicide prevention and mental health awareness. Why a semicolon? A semicolon is used when an author could have chosen to end their sentence, but chose not to. The author is you and the sentence is your life. Today, people all over the world are tattooing the mark as a reminder of their struggle, victory, and survival.

Mental health patient suicides reach 10-year high

Mental health patient suicides reach 10-year high

The number of suicides by UK mental health patients has reached a 10-year high. The University of Manchester report, which looked at the number of patient suicides from 2003 to 2013, found the highest number - 1,876 - was in 2013. Patient suicides accounted for 30% of all suicides in 2013 - an increase of 3% from 10 years earlier.The largest rise was seen in middle-aged men, 45 to 54 years old, where the increase since 2006 was 73%. Alcohol and economic factors such as job loss and debt may be contributing to the rise.

The psychiatrist’s couch

The psychiatrist’s couch

The term "psychiatrist's couch" has become synonymous with the treatment given by any therapist. Real consultation rooms don't look like this but there was a real couch that started the stereotype. The first psychoanalyst's couch was a Victorian day-bed - reportedly given as a gift to Austrian neurologist Sigmund Freud by a grateful female patient, Madame Benvenisti, in around 1890. It is sturdy and solid, draped in a multi-coloured, rich Iranian rug and scattered with well-worn cushions.

Stress takes its toll in public services

Stress takes its toll in public services

Long hours, a lack of breaks and a fraught working day are all too common for workers in the public and voluntary sectors. NHS staff are the most likely of all public sector workers to feel stressed because of their job. More than 60% say they feel stressed all or most of the time, and 59% say they feel more stressed this year than last year. NHS workers are the least likely to take a break during a working day. Just over a quarter (26%) don’t take a break at all, and only around one in 10 takes more than half an hour. And the large majority of NHS workers (96%) work beyond their contracted hours, doing an average of five extra hours per week.

The science of interrogation

The science of interrogation

The Army Field Manual is the guidebook for US military interrogators listing techniques they’re authorized to use in questioning detainees. Soon after Barack Obama moved into the Oval Office in 2009, he issued an executive order that required all U.S. government interrogators to abide by the manual, which prohibits waterboarding, prolonged sleep deprivation and other 'enhanced interrogation techniques' used by the CIA after 9/11. Yet according to experts, the manual is useless because it is unscientific.

Paul Gascoigne talks about alcoholism

Paul Gascoigne talks about alcoholism

After retiring from professional football, Paul Gascoigne's life has been dominated by mental health problems. In an interview with BBC Sport, he talks openly about his diagnosis, struggles and ongoing battle with alcoholism. [Image from The Guardian newspaper]

Making room for new memories

Making room for new memories

Researchers set out to investigate what happens in the brain when we try to remember information that’s very similar to what we already know. This is important because similar information is more likely to interfere with existing knowledge. The study showed that instead of just crowding in, the brain purges an earlier association when that association is revised. In a sense, forgetting is our brain’s way of sorting memories, so the most relevant memories are ready for retrieval. Normal forgetting may even be a safety mechanism to ensure our brain doesn’t become too full.

Why are people so mean to each other online?

Why are people so mean to each other online?

As communication is increasingly using online methods, the question arises as to why people are so mean to each other? Are people less inhibited online or is it simply the trolls that incite arguments?