Friday, November 16 2018
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Could Vladimir Putin suffer with Asperger’s syndrome?

Could Vladimir Putin suffer with Asperger’s syndrome?

A US Pentagon report from 2008 concluded that the Russian President carries a neurological abnormality, described as a form of autism. The study was based only of videos of Putin. Putin's authoritarian style and obsession with extreme control is a way of overcompensating for his condition, the researchers concluded.

The man trapped in constant deja vu

The man trapped in constant deja vu

The term deja vu was coined in 1876 by the French philosopher Emile Boirac. It is the overwhelming sense that you have already experienced something before. It translates literally from French as 'already seen'. According to research, about two thirds of us experience at least one deja vu in our lifetime, yet very little is known about what causes it. A group of scientists have studied the strange case of the man with 'chronic deja vu'.

How neuroscience patients helped our understanding of the brain

How neuroscience patients helped our understanding of the brain

The stories of five neuroscience patients that enhanced our understanding of the brain. Includes patient 'Tan', who could understand speech but had a severely limited vocabulary of his own, leading to the discovery by Broca (pictured) that speech production and speech comprehension regions of the brain are quite separable.

Could Tourette’s syndrome make a goalkeeper better?

Could Tourette’s syndrome make a goalkeeper better?

Despite the USA losing 2-1 to Belgium in the FIFA World Cup, it could have been a lot worse had it not been for goalkeeper Tim Howard breaking the record for most saves in a World Cup match with 16. Previously, the USA player has suggested that the fact he lives with Tourette's syndrome - a condition characterised by multiple motor tics, and at least one vocal tic - has made him a better athlete. Studies have shown that individuals with Tourette's are 'super-good' at controlling their voluntary movements. A hypothesis is that people with the condition become highly conscious of their physical actions as they learn to control their tics.