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Constant email notifications are a source of stress

Constant email notifications are a source of stress

Due to technology enabling people to be at their email's constant beck and call, a culture has developed where people must feel they are constantly available for work. As a result, an 'unwritten organisational etiquette' has become ingrained in the workplace and employees have developed habits which negatively impact on their emotional well-being. Studies have found that continuously checking and reading emails due to a 'push notification' feature which alerts users to new messages even when they are not in their Mail app, prompts signs of tension and worry.

Stress takes its toll in public services

Stress takes its toll in public services

Long hours, a lack of breaks and a fraught working day are all too common for workers in the public and voluntary sectors. NHS staff are the most likely of all public sector workers to feel stressed because of their job. More than 60% say they feel stressed all or most of the time, and 59% say they feel more stressed this year than last year. NHS workers are the least likely to take a break during a working day. Just over a quarter (26%) don’t take a break at all, and only around one in 10 takes more than half an hour. And the large majority of NHS workers (96%) work beyond their contracted hours, doing an average of five extra hours per week.

Nomophobia - smartphone separation anxiety

Nomophobia - smartphone separation anxiety

The four major characteristics of nomophobia (no-mobile-phone phobia): 1) Can't communicate - people feel insecure when they can't text or call their friends and family; 2) Lost connectedness - people feel they're disconnected from their online identity; 3) Can't access information - people feel inadequate because they can't Google answers to their questions or find directions with a swipe, for example; 4) It's inconvenient - people feel annoyed that they can't accomplish simple tasks, such as making plans or dinner reservations, as easily without a smartphone.

Can social media cause PTSD?

Can social media cause PTSD?

A researcher has suggested that some social media users could develop symptoms similar to those of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) simply by viewing violent or disturbing content. Usually to be diagnosed with the disorder, symptoms - which include flashbacks, avoidance, sleep disturbances and mood changes - must continue for more than a month after the traumatic event. The idea that the disorder could be triggered just by watching online videos is controversial.

10 things you might not know about trichotillomania

10 things you might not know about trichotillomania

Trichotillomania is a condition which causes sufferers to compulsively pull out their hair. A patient lists some key facts.

Smartphone stress - the ‘always on’ culture

Smartphone stress - the ‘always on’ culture

For some people, portable connected devices have liberated them from the constraints of the nine-to-five. Flexible working has given them more autonomy over their working lives and enabled them to spend more time with their friends and families. For many others though, smartphones have become tyrants in our pockets, never allowing us to switch off, relax and recharge our batteries. And a number of commentators are becoming increasingly concerned about the syndrome.

Oscar Pistorius had no mental illness

Oscar Pistorius had no mental illness

The court-appointed psychiatric team comprising three psychiatrists and one psychologist have concluded after a 30 day evaluation that Oscar Pistorius suffered from no mental illness or defect that would have compromised his actions on the night he gunned down girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp. They have dismissed the diagnosis by Dr Merryll Vorster, a psychiatrist called by the defence to evaluate Pistorius, that he was suffering from Generalised Anxiety Disorder which might have affected his actions on the night.

Tips on tackling work fear

Tips on tackling work fear

Most of us spend Sundays dreading Monday morning at work. So much so that you end up hating Sundays. Entrepreneur Josephine Fairley offers practical tips for overcoming work fear.

World War One and shell shock

World War One and shell shock

Cambridge psychologist and Army medical officer, Charles Myers, was the first person to use the phrase 'shell shock' almost 100 years ago. He published his findings in The Lancet in 1915 and his work led to a change in the way such patients were treated.

Anxiety in films

Anxiety in films

Can films help us understand anxiety as a clinical condition? Yes, says Jonathan Keane, film curator for the Mental Health Foundation's first anxiety arts festival. "The history of film," he says, "is the history of anxiety. At a screening of the Lumière brothers' early film The Arrival of a Train at La Ciotat, people ran out screaming: they thought the train was coming right at them. But film doesn't just make us feel anxious: it also stages anxiety, and helps us to understand how it works."

Work stress

Work stress

Workers in the UK took an average 5.3 days off work in 2012, with stress, anxiety and depression given as the main causes of absence. Sick leave is costing the UK economy £14bn a year so there is a strong financial incentive for businesses to keep their workers as healthy and happy as possible.

Work-related stress
  •  06 01 2014
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